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California Incense-Cedar

California Incense-Cedar

Yosemite National Park, California. 
Attribution: Victor R. Ruiz from Arinaga, Canary Islands, Spain [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Information

Latin (group) name: Libocedrus
Latin (specific) name: Libocedrus Decurrens
Average max height: 75' to 125'
Average diameter: 18" to 40"
Associated state: none
Category: American Woods
The Softwoods - Conifers

Growth Range Map

Species-Climate Profile for Incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens)
Attribution: USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station
Source: https://forest.moscowfsl.wsu.edu/climate/species/speciesDist/Incense-cedar/current.png


The Tree

California Incense-Cedar is a well formed tree 75 to 125 feet tall and 18 to 40 inches in diameter. This is the only species of this genus growing in the United States. An important forest tree of the Pacific Coast , it thrives in the higher elevations of the Cascades, Sierra Nevada and other mountainous regions of California. The bark is deeply furrowed, two to three inches thick at the base and one inch thick midway of the tree's height. On the younger trees the bark is thin, smooth, slightly scaly and a reddish cinnamon or purplish-red color and has a silver sheen to the bark scales. On the mature trees the bark is shreddy and a cinnamon-brown color. The evergreen yellowish-greenleaves are small, scale like, rather pointed, and closely overlap one another, the branchlets forming a flat spray. These leaves have small resin glands and when crushed or bruised give off a pungent aromatic odor. The cones are small, smooth, pointed, three-quarters of an inch long, area light-yellowish-browncolor, and hang downward from the ends of the small branches. A fungus attacks the live trees, causing cavities in the heartwood. The tree is planted extensively for ornamental and landscape purposes.

 open cones
California Incense-Cedar open cones
 pollen cones
California Incense-Cedar pollen cones
foliage
California Incense-Cedar foliage

 tree bark
California Incense-Cedar tree bark

Common Names in Use

  • California Incense-Cedar (lit. and hort.)
  • Bastard Cedar (Calif., Wash.)
  • California Post Cedar (Calif., lit.)
  • Cedar (Calif., Oreg., and trade)
  • Incense Cedar (Calif., Oreg., and trade)
  • Juniper (Nev.)
  • Post Cedar (Calif., Nev.)
  • Red Cedar
  • Roughbark Cedar (trade)
  • White Cedar (Calif., Oreg.)

Growth Range

The natural growth range of California Incense-Cedar extends from southwestern Oregon southward through California into Lower California. Small stands are also found in western Nevada.

The Wood

The heartwood of California Incense-Cedar is a light-tan color often tinged with red or a pale, dull, yellowish-brown, tinged with a reddish or lavender hue, which darkens with age and exposure. The sapwood is white or cream-color. The soft wood has a fine compact grain, uniform texture, is light in weight, very straight-grained, and has a spicy, resinous odor. It splits very easily and evenly, is easy to work with tools and takes a good polish.

cedar slab
California Incense-Cedar Slab by Cook Woods
cedar image
California Incense-Cedar by Houghs, The American Woods

Uses

This wood is used for lumber, fence posts, shingles, toys, “mothproof” chests, and closet linings. Because of its softness and straight grain, large quantities are used for pencil manufacture. It is also used for Venetian blinds and for novelties. Some types of furniture may be made from this wood which finishes beautifully.

File References

  ID T Name Size Last modified Actions
290 Libocedrus Decurrens Torrey
Yosemite National Park, California.
Attribution: Victor R. Ruiz from Arinaga, Canary Islands, Spain [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
225.80 KB 12-28-2018
289 California Incense Cedar Open Cones
South end of Manzanita Safety Rest Area, Southbound Interstate 5, milepost 62.8, 6 miles north of en:Grants Pass, Oregon.
Attribution: No machine-readable author provided. Wsiegmund assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons
232.67 KB 12-28-2018
288 California Incense Cedar Pollen Cones
North end of Manzanita Safety Rest Area, Southbound Interstate 5, milepost 62.8, 6 miles north of en:Grants Pass, Oregon.
Attribution: No machine-readable author provided. Wsiegmund assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons
257.36 KB 12-28-2018
292 California Incense Cedar Foliage

California Incense-cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) foliage in PAN Botanical Garden in Warsaw, Poland
Attribution: Crusier [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Calocedrus_decurrens_foliage_PAN.JPG
271.69 KB 12-29-2018
291 California Incense Cedar Tree Bark
Calocedrus decurrens—incense cedar. Photographed at Regional Parks Botanic Garden located in Tilden Regional Park near Berkeley, CA.
Reference: Rusk, John. H20110613-3607--Calocedrus Decurrens (Bark)--RPBG. 13 June 2011. Flickr, https://www.flickr.com/photos/john_d_rusk/32272123536/.
1.20 MB 12-29-2018
293 California Incense Cedar Slab
California Incense Cedar Slab by Cook Woods
Reference: “Lumber & Slabs.” Cook Woods, https://www.cookwoods.com/collections/lumber-slabs. Accessed 29 Dec. 2018.
205.14 KB 12-29-2018
327 California Incense Cedar By Hough
A page from Romeyn Beck Hough’s unique fourteen volume work The American Woods, a collection of more than 1000 paper-thin wood samples representing more than 350 varieties of North American tree. Between 1888 and 1913, Hough published a total of thirteen volumes of the work, but died in 1923 before being able to fulfil his epic fifteen volume plan.
Source:https://publicdomainreview.org/collections/the-american-woods/
151.66 KB 01-13-2019

Bibliography


  • Shelley E. Schoonover (American Woods) 1951 (Watling & Co. ) Santa Monica, CA 

Contributors to this page: admin .
Page last modified on Tuesday January 15, 2019 20:23:04 PST by admin.