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Longleaf Pine

This image is Image Number 1150076 at Forestry Images, a source for forest health, natural resources and silviculture images operated by The Bugwood Network at the University of Georgia and the USDA Forest Service
Attribution: By Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia [CC BY 3.0 us (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/deed.en)], via Wikimedia Commons
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pinus_palustris_UGA1.jpg

Latin (group) name: Pinus
Latin (specific) name: Pinus Pasustris
Average max height: 100' to 120'
Average diameter: 24" to 36"
Associated state: none
Category: American Woods
The Softwoods - Conifers
Pine



The Tree

The Longleaf Pine is one of the outstanding pines of the southern forests and one of the four southern yellow pines. It is a straight tree 100 to 120 feet tall with a trunk 24 to 36 inches in diameter. Limbs are comparatively sparse and open. The trunk is high and clear for nearly two-thirds the height of the tree. The bark is lightly furrowed into broad scales and is of an orange-brown color. It is conspicuous by its shiny flexible needles, 8 to 18 inches long, dark green in color, with three in a cluster, which drop off in two years. The name Longleaf is given the tree because of its very long needles. The cinnamon colored cones are 5 to 10 inches long with thick scales, forming in clusters of several cones each. The tree is subject to attack by the Southern Pine beetle and other insects and fungus diseases. The “razorback” hog is very fond of the young tender roots.

longleaf pine cones
Longleaf Pine Cones, usually three in a bunch
longleaf pine tree bark
Longleaf Pine tree bark

Common Names in Use

  • Longleaf Pine (trade)
  • Broan Pine (Tenn.)
  • Broom Pine (lit.)
  • Fat Pine (South U.S.)
  • Florida Longleaf Yellow Pine (trade)
  • Florida Longleaved Pine (Atlantic region)
  • Florida Pine (Atlantic region)
  • Florida Yellow Pine (Atlantic reg.)
  • Georgia Heart Pine (general)
  • Georgia Longleaved Pine (Atlantic region)
  • Georgia Pine (general, Del. region)
  • Georgia Pitch Pine (Atlantic region)
  • Georgia Yellow Pine (Atlantic)
  • Hard Pine (Ala., Miss., La.)
  • Heart Pine(N.C. and So. Atlantic region)
  • Longleaf Pitch Pine (Atlantic reg.)
  • Longleaved Pine (Va., N.C., S.C., Ga., Ala., Fla., Miss., La., Tex.)
  • Longleaved Yellow Pine (trade and Atlantic region.)
  • Longstraw Pine (Atlantic region)
  • North Carolina Pitch Pine (Va., N.C.)
  • Pitch Pine (Atlantic region)
  • Rosemary Pine (N.C.)
  • Southern Hard Pine (general)
  • Southern Heart Pine (general)
  • Southern Pine (N.C., Ala., Miss., La., and trade)
  • Southern Pitch Pine (general)
  • Southern Yellow Pine (general and trade)
  • Texas Longlcaved Pine (Atlantic region)
  • Texas Yellow Pine (Atlantic region)
  • Turpentine Pine (N.C.)
  • Yellow Pine (Del., N.C., S.C., Ala., Fla., La., Tex., and trade)

Growth Range

The growth range of Longleaf Pine extends from the southeastern coastal plain of Virginia through North and South Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and eastern Texas.

The Wood

Longleaf Pine wood is very resinous, hard, stiff, straight but uneven-grained, medium-textured, strong and durable. Care must be exercised in working with tools. The heartwood is a beautiful light reddish-tan to orange-brown while the sapwood is thin and nearly white. The growth rings are plainly visible. It nails hard but holds nails and screws satisfactorily. When properly seasoned the wood stays in place very well. It is one of the few pines having a pronounced figure. Quite frequently a beautiful blister figure is found in Longleaf Pine.

Uses

This is one of the important naval stores trees in the United States, from which is derived large quantities of turpentine and rosin. A “face” is made by chipping away the bark and collecting the resinous sap; also, the chips from subsequent faces are distilled for naval stores. It is also an important lumber tree for heavy general construction, railroad car construction, ties, piles, poles, ship building, flooring, interior finish, wainscoting, sash, frames, agricultural implements, cooperage, and cheap furniture. Some quantities of it are also used for paper pulp.

File References

  ID T Name Size Last modified Actions
146 Pinus Palustris (Miller).jpg
This image is Image Number 1150076 at Forestry Images, a source for forest health, natural resources and silviculture images operated by The Bugwood Network at the University of Georgia and the USDA Forest Service
Attribution: By Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia [CC BY 3.0 us (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/deed.en)], via Wikimedia Commons
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pinus_palustris_UGA1.jpg
941.12 KB 01-30-2019
147 Long Leaf Pine Cones
Longleaf pine cones typically appear three in a bunch, note the long needles surrounding the cones, thus the name, Longleaf Pine
443.06 KB 01-30-2019
148 Longleaf Pine Bark
Longleaf pine has one of the thickest bark coverings of all the southeastern pines, an adaptation to the frequent fires that once burned the extensive longleaf pine forests. The bark, which develops quickly after the grass stage, insulates the cambium against deadly high temperatures during fires.
Reference: Longleaf Pine Bark. https://projects.ncsu.edu/project/dendrology/index/plantae/vascular/seedplants/gymnosperms/conifers/pine/pinus/australes/longleaf/bark.html. Accessed 12 Aug. 2018.
223.05 KB 01-30-2019

Bibliography


  • Shelley E. Schoonover (American Woods) 1951 (Watling & Co. ) Santa Monica, CA 


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Page last modified on Friday May 8, 2020 11:53:14 PDT by admin.