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Virginia Pine

Open-grown tree along the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina [C.J. Earle, 2004.10.26].

Reference: Pinus Virginiana (Virginia Pine) Description. https://www.conifers.org/pi/Pinus_virginiana.php. Accessed 5 Aug. 2018.

Latin (group) name: Pinus
Latin (specific) name: Pinus Virginiana (Miller)
Average max height: 40' to 50'
Average diameter: 12' to 18"
Associated state: none
Category: American Woods
The Softwoods - Conifers
Pine



The Tree

Virginia Pine is a tree similar in shape to Jack Pine with long branches, more or less ragged, and a flat straggly open top with usually a comparatively short trunk. Generally the tree is 40 to 50 feet tall with a trunk diameter of 12 to 18 inches, but larger individual trees are also found. The needles are two per bundle one and a half to three inches long, stiff, sharply pointed, twisted, a grayish green color, and distributed well over the long smooth branches. The cones mature in two seasons, are 2 to 3 inches long growing closely to the twig. These cones have slender scales and sharp spines or prickles. The dark brown bark of this pine is one-quarter to one-half inch thick with shallow furrows forming rather small scales.

virginia pine pollen cones
Virginia Pine Pollen Cones
virginia pine bark
Virginia Pine bark

Common Names in Use

  • Virginia Pine (Md.,Va., N.C., trade)
  • Alligator Pine (N.C.)
  • Black Pine (Ga)
  • Cedar Pine (N.C.)
  • Hickory Pine (N.C.)
  • Jersey Pine (N.I., Pa., Del., N.C., S.C.)
  • New Jersey Pine (lit.)
  • Nigger Pine (Tenn,, Ga.)
  • North Carolina Pine (N.C.)
  • Poverty Pine
  • River Pine (N.C.)
  • Scrub Pine (R.I., N.Y., Pa., Del., N.C., S.C., Ohio)
  • Shortschat Pine (Del.)
  • Shortleaved (N. C.)
  • Spruce (Ga.)
  • Spruce Pine (N.I., Md., Va., N.C., S.C., Tenn., Ala.)


Growth Range

The growth range of Virginia Pine extends from Long Island and the south half of Pennsylvania southward to central Georgia and westward across the Allegheny Mountains to southern Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, central Alabama, and northeastern Mississippi.

The Wood

The heartwood of the Vinginia Pine is a light orange to yellow-tan, soft, light, coarse-grained, brittle and generally quite knotty. It is non-porous and considerably resinous.

Uses

This pine, although containing considerable resin, is increasingly used for paper pulp, mine props, piling, railroad ties and lumber for general construction. Tar and charcoal are also made from it.

File References

  ID Filename Name Description Size Last modified Last modified by Actions
136 Pinus Virginiana.jpg Pinus Virginiana Open-grown tree along the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina [C.J. Earle, 2004.10.26].

Reference: Pinus Virginiana (Virginia Pine) Description. https://www.conifers.org/pi/Pinus_virginiana.php. Accessed 5 Aug. 2018.
113.67 KB 10-31-2019
137 Virginia Pine Pollen Cones.jpg Virginia Pine Pollen Cones Pinus virginiana (Virginia Pine) new growth and pollen cones along the Mount Misery Trail in Brendan T. Byrne State Forest, New Jersey

Attribution: By Famartin [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2013-05-10_10_32_15_Virginia_Pine_new_growth_and_pollen_cones_along_the_Mount_Misery_Trail_in_Brendan_T._Byrne_State_Forest,_New_Jersey.jpg
209.36 KB 08-05-2018
138 Virginia Pine Bark.jpg Virginia Pine Bark Photograph of the trunk bark of the Scrub Pineen (Pinus virginiana en ). Photo taken at the Tyler Arboretum where it was identified.

Attribution: By Photo (c)2007 Derek Ramsey (Ram-Man) [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)], from Wikimedia Commons
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Scrub_Pine_Pinus_virginiana_Trunk_Bark_2000px.jpg
315.44 KB 08-05-2018

Bibliography


  • Shelley E. Schoonover (American Woods) 1951 (Watling & Co. ) Santa Monica, CA 


Contributors to this page: admin and John Morris .
Page last modified on Thursday October 31, 2019 04:02:45 PDT by admin.