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Pitch Pine

Pitch Pine trees and view west from the Hoeferlin Trail in Ramapo Mountain State Forest, New Jersey

Attribution: By Famartin [CC BY-SA 3.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2013-05-12_11_23_41_Pitch_Pine_trees_and_view_west_from_the_Hoeferlin_Trail_in_Ramapo_Mountain_State_Forest_in_New_Jersey.jpg

Latin (group) name: Pinus
Latin (specific) name: Pinus Rigida (Miller)
Average max height: 40' to 70'
Average diameter: 12" to 30"
Associated state: none
Category: American Woods
The Softwoods - Conifers
Pine



The Tree

Pitch Pine is one of the smaller hard pines, attaining a height of 40 to 70 feet with a trunk diameter of from 12 to 30 inches.
Usually it is quite symmetrical, its limb structure and crown resembling a hardwood rather than the straight-stemmed pines. Frequently the branches are contorted, irregular and heavy. The bark on mature trees is one to one and a half inches thick, dark reddish-brownand deeply furrowed into irregular thick scales. The needles are stiff, sharply pointed and wide, two to five inches long in bundles of three and are of a yellowish-green color. The cones which remain on the tree for several years are one and a half to three inches long with wide base, thick scales, prickly pointed. The tree is exceedingly fire resistant although it contains a considerable supply of pitch, which gives the tree its name.

pitch pine cone
Pitch Pine Cone
pitch pine bark
Pitch Pine Bark

Common Names in Use

  • Pitch Pine (Vt, N.H., Mass., R.I., Conn., N.Y., N.J., Pa., Del., W.Va., N.C., S.C., Ga., Ohio, Ontario, Md., Eng.)
  • Black Pine (N.C.)
  • Black Norway Pine (N.Y.)
  • Hard Pine (Mass.)
  • Long-leaf Pine (Del.)
  • Longschat Pine (Del.)
  • Mountain Pine (N.C.)
  • Pennsylvania Yellow Pine (Pa.)
  • Red Pine (N.Y.)
  • Ridge Pine (N.C.)
  • Rigid Pine (Eng., lit.)
  • Sap Pine (lit)
  • Shortleaf Pine (Ga.)
  • Southern Pine (Trade)
  • Southern Yellow Pine
  • Yellow Pine (Pa., Ga.)

Growth Range

The growth range of Pitch Pine extends from Maine southward along the slopes of the Allegheny Mountains to northern Georgia, and westward from New York to the eastern Great Lakes region, thence southward through eastern Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee.

The Wood

The wood of the Pitch Pine has a very high resin content, is coarse-grained, soft, non-porous, brittle, and has a reddish-yellow heartwood. The sapwood is wide, light yellow or nearly white in color and is very susceptible to blue stain in seasoning.

Uses

The lumber of the Pitch Pine is usually marketed with the other pines, particularly the southern pines. It is used for rough general construction, fencing, paper pulp, boxes, crating, railroad ties and other general uses. It is somewhat “gummy” to work with because of the heavy pitch content, but takes paint well.

pitch pine flooring
Pitch Pine flooring

File References

  ID Filename Name Description Size Last modified Last modified by Actions
131 Pinus Rigida.jpg Pinus Rigida.jpg Pitch Pine trees and view west from the Hoeferlin Trail in Ramapo Mountain State Forest, New Jersey

Attribution: By Famartin [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2013-05-12_11_23_41_Pitch_Pine_trees_and_view_west_from_the_Hoeferlin_Trail_in_Ramapo_Mountain_State_Forest_in_New_Jersey.jpg
591.48 KB 08-04-2018
132 Pitch Pine Cone.jpg Pitch Pine Cone Pitch Pine Cone

Attribution: By Crusier [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pinus_rigida_cone_Poland.jpg
254.89 KB 08-04-2018
133 Pitch Pine Bark.jpg Pitch Pine Bark A native of eastern North America, the pitch pine is a species designed for fire. It can be burned to the ground in a forest fire and still sprout new growth from its roots and stump. The wood contains a lot of resin, or 'pitch', making it both rot resistant and flammable. In the past, it was used to make torches, tar and turpentine, as well as in ship building.

Reference: “New England Woods in Winter.” Belonging on Earth, http://www.belongingonearth.com/1/post/2018/01/the-captivating-winter-woods.html. Accessed 5 Aug. 2018.
315.73 KB 08-04-2018

Bibliography


  • Shelley E. Schoonover (American Woods) 1951 (Watling & Co. ) Santa Monica, CA 


Contributors to this page: admin .
Page last modified on Thursday October 31, 2019 04:01:24 PDT by admin.